Are you looking to enhance your professional development?
If so, the Leadership Education and Advancement for Professionals (LEAP) team will provide exclusive training designed to move you forward and strengthen your career in the anti-violence movement.
 
California Coalition Against Sexual Assault (CALCASA) in partnership with Women of Color Network (WOCN, Inc.) has established the Leadership Education and Advancement for Professionals (LEAP) Project. LEAP’s primary purpose is to enhance the professional skills of individuals of color seeking professional advancement in the anti-violence against women field.
The information session will cover LEAP goals, program structure, and the application process.

LEAP Cohort 4

*Monday* September 9, 2019
10 am PST/ 12 pm CST/ 1 pm EST
Duration: 1 hour
Dial-In: 1 669 900 6833 US (San Jose)
+1 929 436 2866 US
Meeting ID: 151 576 981
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For questions contact:
Adrienne N. Spires, Project Coordinator at [email protected]

Last week, CALCASA,  joined dozens of anti-sexual violence organizations to speak out against the mistreatment of refugees and immigrants held in detention at the U.S. southern border.

 

The text of the full statement is below and can be found here.

 

ANTI-SEXUAL VIOLENCE COALITIONS NATIONWIDE CONDEMN THE MISTREATMENT OF REFUGEES AND IMMIGRANTS HELD IN DETENTION

Demand end to ICE raids and POC community monitoring

State and national sexual assault coalitions across the country are united in condemning the separation of children from family members as well as the violence and dehumanizing conditions faced by people being held in detention. The treatment of adults and children while detained in U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) migrant detention centers under the jurisdiction of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is dehumanizing and therefore unacceptable. It must come to an immediate end.

We represent survivors of and advocates against sexual harassment, abuse and assault throughout the country. Many people coming to the U.S. are fleeing from sexual violence in their countries of origin. As advocates, it is incumbent upon us to bear witness and take action against cruelty.

Whereas there are no less than two immigrant detention centers per state, including Puerto Rico, and 184 centers in the state of Texas, we demand accountability from all officials and legislators for the atrocities that continue within these tax-payer funded detention facilities and camps.

Recorded reports of abuse include the following:

Overcrowding

Lack of access to clean water and food

Physical abuse

Sexual assault

Unsanitary living conditions

Medical neglect

Verbal/psychological abuse

LGBTQ+ discriminatory behavior

There have also been reports of systemic and widespread sexual harassment, abuse, and assault occurring in ICE detention facilities across the nation and only 2 percent of complaints having been investigated, in clear violation of the Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) standards. According to Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) documents, thousands of migrant children have experienced sexual abuse while in U.S. government custody under the Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR) since 2015.

Reporters have not been allowed to speak with detainees or to record the conditions inside the facilities. Doctors are not able to access important medical records of refugees due to the lack of transparency from U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement and U.S. Customs and Border Protection. These agencies’ policies are unacceptable and undermine advocates working to end and prevent violence, who understand that a culture of silence creates a dangerous environment for violence to run rampant and unchecked.

It is imperative that all legislators, local and national, address the humanitarian crisis at our southern border immediately. We demand the current administration completely end the practice of separating children from their parents and minimize the placement of children and families in detention settings that expose them to further traumatization and dangerous living conditions. Additionally, legislators must work together to support policies that reduce obstacles to good-faith asylum claims, and avoid creating new ones.

We ask our supporters to contact their legislators regarding this statement and mention the concerns we have listed. We demand an end to secrecy by all immigration agencies and an end to the inhumane conditions that refugees are forced to endure inside detention centers and camps. We want an end to U.S. Immigration and Custom Enforcement (ICE) raids that unfairly target communities of color and funnel more people into the inhumane conditions within DHS detention facilities. We urge all legislators to take a bipartisan, humanitarian position by acting to protect immigrants and refugees within our borders. Human rights, and the dignity of every person, are not partisan issues.

Other actions include supporting and reaching out to the sponsors of crucial legislation such as:

The Northern Triangle and Border Stabilization Act of 2019 (H.R. 3524), which requires better treatment of detained children at the border, including by setting standards for CBP facilities and directing the hiring of child welfare professionals.

The Child Trafficking Victims Protection and Welfare Act (S. 661), which provides for the safe and appropriate treatment of children in CBP custody by requiring at least one licensed child welfare professional at ports of entry and Border Patrol stations that regularly hold a large number of children. The bill also provides minimum standards of care for children in CBP custody.

Together, we can prevent the continued sexual harassment, abuse, and assault of all persons regardless of race, gender, ethnicity, or documentation status.

SIGNED:

ALAS: ALIANZA LATINA EN CONTRA LA AGRESIÓN SEXUAL

AMERICAN SAMOA ALLIANCE AGAINST DOMESTIC AND SEXUAL VIOLENCE

ARTE SANA

ARIZONA COALITION TO END SEXUAL & DOMESTIC VIOLENCE

ARKANSAS COALITION AGAINST SEXUAL ASSAULT

CALIFORNIA COALITION AGAINST SEXUAL ASSAULT

CONNECTICUT ALLIANCE TO END SEXUAL VIOLENCE

COLORADO COALITION AGAINST SEXUAL ASSAULT

FLORIDA COUNCIL AGAINST SEXUAL VIOLENCE

IDAHO COALITION AGAINST SEXUAL & DOMESTIC VIOLENCE

IOWA COALITION AGAINST SEXUAL ASSAULT

JANE DOE INC. (Massachusetts)

MAINE COALITION AGAINST SEXUAL ASSAULT

MARYLAND COALITION AGAINST SEXUAL ASSAULT

MINNESOTA COALITION AGAINST SEXUAL ASSAULT

MONTANA COALITION AGAINST DOMESTIC AND SEXUAL VIOLENCE

NATIONAL ALLIANCE TO END SEXUAL VIOLENCE

NEW HAMPSHIRE COALITION AGAINST DOMESTIC AND SEXUAL VIOLENCE

NEW JERSEY COALITION AGAINST SEXUAL ASSAULT

NEW MEXICO COALITION OF SEXUAL ASSAULT PROGRAMS, INC.

NEW YORK STATE COALITION AGAINST SEXUAL ASSAULT

NEVADA COALITION TO END DOMESTIC AND SEXUAL VIOLENCE

OHIO ALLIANCE TO END SEXUAL VIOLENCE

OREGON COALITION AGAINST DOMESTIC AND SEXUAL VIOLENCE

PENNSYLVANIA COALITION AGAINST RAPE

TEXAS ASSOCIATION AGAINST SEXUAL ASSAULT

VERMONT NETWORK AGAINST DOMESTIC AND SEXUAL VIOLENCE

VIRGINIA SEXUAL AND DOMESTIC VIOLENCE ACTION ALLIANCE

WASHINGTON COALITION OF SEXUAL ASSAULT PROGRAMS

WEST VIRGINIA FOUNDATION FOR RAPE INFORMATION AND SERVICES

WISCONSIN COALITION AGAINST SEXUAL ASSAULT

###

 

 

We are incredibly proud to announce that our collective efforts with the CaliforniaPartnership to End Domestic Violence (Partnership), our members, advocates, and allies have led to a $5 million state budget allocation to prevent sexual and domestic violence. This is a testament to all our hard work to increase awareness of prevention at the Capitol. We’ve sustained policymakers’ attention to this issue for the second year in a row—and during the transition to a new Governor. This victory is also significant because prevention funding is uncommon in state budgets throughout the nation, making California one of the only places to prioritize it in its budget. We invite you to read our statement below, and celebrate your hard work as a part of this success!

CALCASA CEO Sandra Henriquez, and Partnership Director of Programs Jacquie Marroquin responded with a joint statement:

“This funding allocation puts resources behind long-term solutions that lead to cultural shifts. This is a critical investment aimed at addressing the sexual harassment, sexual assault and domestic violence in our state. In California, 86% of women and 53% of men reported experiencing some form of sexual harassment and/or assault in their lifetime, and an estimated 1.6 million women and men experience domestic violence each year. In pockets of California, organizations committed to ending sexual and domestic violence have been successful in their proactive approaches to ending violence in their communities. This funding will expand and deepen that work all across the state…”

Read the full statement here.

 

Together with San Diego School of Medicine’s Center for Gender Equity and Health (GEH), CALCASA is pleased to release a new report Measuring #MeToo in California.
This new report shows that sexual harassment and assault are widespread problems in California and that a robust investment in preventing sexual violence is desperately needed. This study marks the first time data has been made available on a statewide sample of Californians experiencing sexual harassment and assault. Released in the wake of the groundbreaking societal reckoning with sexual harassment and assault prompted by the #MeToo movement, the study’s major findings include:
  • Statewide, 86% of women and 53% of men reported experiencing some form of sexual harassment and/or assault in their lifetime.
  • Men born outside the US were significantly more likely than men born in the US to report that they had experienced sexual harassment
  • More people believed harassment or assault happened in most or all cases (56% of women, 51% of men) than believed that harassment or assault did not happen in most cases (8% of women, 9% of men).
“This report demonstrates that sexual harassment is prevalent and ubiquitous in California, no matter who you are or where you live, and at the same time we also see increased risk among some of the most marginalized groups,” said Dr. Anita Raj, PhD, director of GEH and a professor in the Department of Medicine at UC San Diego School of Medicine and a professor in the Department of Education Studies in the UC San Diego Division of Social Sciences.
In 2018 the California legislature provided $5 million in one-time funding for rape crisis center programs. Yet our study demonstrates that the problem of sexual harassment and assault goes beyond the workplace and the need to provide services to those who have been abused. Our recent report, “The Costs and Consequences of Sexual Violence In California,” demonstrated that in 2012 the costs of sexual violence totaled $140 billion. California must do more to stop and prevent sexual assault and harassment earlier.
“Prevention efforts, including education in schools as early as possible around issues of consent and harassment are crucial,” said David S. Lee, director of prevention for CALCASA. “We know that prevention works, and it’s necessary to shift to a culture where individuals look out for one another.”
The research is clear: There is a high prevalence of sexual assault and harassment in California and prevention strategies can help our state prevail over sexual violence.
Together with Senator Jim Beall, Assemblywoman Blanca Rubio, and the California Partnership to End Domestic Violence (the Partnership), CALCASA is advocating for $50 million in ongoing funding for prevention strategies. For more information visit:http://www.calcasa.org/preventionworks.

PreventConnect has a 2-part podcast where they discuss the pilot program of CALCASA’s faith-based collaborative to address gender-based violence through prevention and intervention. 

Prevention in Faith-Based Institutions: Shared Values

On this podcast, guests discuss how this faith-based prevention initiative began and highlight the values both faith institutions and the anti-sexual violence movement share.

Prevention in Faith-Based Institutions: Building Partnerships

On this podcast, guests discuss their successes with the faith-based prevention initiative, as well as impart their advice for prevention practitioners looking to engage churches and other faith-based organizations in prevention.

 

 

CALCASA was contacted by a survivor who has been working with attorneys, advocates, and academics to raise awareness and bring an end to a traumatic practice referred to as ‘court-ordered rape,’ or invasive gynecological exams that survivors of sexual assault are ordered to endure in the course of proceedings against their perpetrators.

If you are a survivor who has been ordered to undergo such an exam, you can access free, confidential help by reaching out to your local rape crisis program.

Raising Awareness About ‘Court-Ordered Rape’