On Wednesday, Dec. 14, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released the 2010 National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS). This is an ongoing, nationally representative survey that assesses experiences of sexual violence, stalking, and intimate partner violence among adult women and men in the United States. This large-scale ongoing study confirms many realities that advocates and educators already know about sexual violence, intimate partner violence, and stalking: These forms of violence continue to be pervasive and deserve more attention and funding. It also sheds new light on the scope and context of these forms of violence. Below are support materials for NISVS. Please feel free to download and share these documents:

Download NISVS Talking Points for California
Download NISVS Potential Media Questions
Download CALCASA’s Press Release for NISVS Implications

The study reveals that nearly 1 in 2 women (44.6%) and 1 in 5 men (22.2%) experience sexual violence other than rape throughout their lifetime. Approximately 1.3 million women reported being raped in the 12 months prior to taking the survey, which makes this a crucial time for rape crisis centers to reach out to members of the community. Currently, rape crisis centers are facing funding challenges to support intervention and prevention efforts. In California, Rape Prevention Education awards have been reduced to 40 percent from previous years. Additionally, the CDC is not awarding on all Public Health Block Grant money, including the $7 million “Rape Set Aside” money that is distributed to coalitions and centers throughout the country. Programs funded by the rape set aside are being told that the CDC cannot ensure that they will receive funds for their work in FY 2012. California’s 63 Rape Crisis Centers and service providers could stand to lose more than $800,000 as a result of this budget dispute.

A majority of funding dedicated to rape crisis centers is delivered from the federal budget, not the state budget. In California, there is only $45,000 annually committed to sexual violence programs from the State Budget. In the 2010/2011, about 30,000 Californians accessed intervention services, which means the state allotted about $1.50 for each person served. The NISVIS survey shows that there are more than 2 million people in the California who are survivors of rape. Due to the small amount of funding provided by the state, rape crisis centers struggle to reach all survivors. In order to see these numbers decrease, and to help foster healthier communities, California needs to see a funding initiative for rape crisis centers. The social norms that contribute to violence can be changed, and rape crisis centers and other anti-violence programs need financial support to meet such a goal.

NISVS Background:

  • NISVS measures lifetime victimization for sexual violence, stalking and intimate partner violence, as well as victimization in the 12 months prior to the survey.
  • The survey goes beyond counting actions of sexual violence, stalking and intimate partner violence by assessing the range of violence experienced by victims and the impact of that victimization.
  • The report also includes the first-ever simultaneous national and state-level prevalence estimates of these forms of violence for all states.
  • The NISVS 2010 Summary Report presents data from the first year of data collection, based on 16,507 completed telephone interviews (9,086 women and 7,421 men) in the general population sample.
  • Whereas other data surveys are collected with a crime and/or public safety context, NISVS frames the issues as they relate to public health.
  • Other surveys, such as the FBI’s Uniform Crime Report, collected voluntary data from law enforcement agencies. NISVS data is collected randomly, representative of each state.
  • An estimated 12,500 interviews are planned each year from 2011 to 2013, which should provide stable state-level estimates.

As advocates and educators, we believe that violence can be prevented and its impact can be reduced. The data from NISVS will help inform areas such as prevention & intervention efforts, strategic planning, policy and program development. NISVS provides a compelling reason to support primary prevention initiatives to ultimately reduce sexual violence in our communities. The social norms that contribute to violence can be changed. Primary prevention reaches beyond a reaction to these health issues; it provides a proactive paradigm in which communities can identify how to nurture future generations to be healthier and less violent.

View the complete report and toolkit online at www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/nisvs. You can also find materials on VawNet’s NISVS Resource Page and the NSVRC’s NISVS Page.

Below are support materials for NISVS. Please feel free to download and share these documents:
Download NISVS Talking Points for California
Download NISVS Potential Media Questions
Download CALCASA’s Press Release for NISVS Implications